News
The Adams Street Shul

Congregation Agudas Achim Anshei Sfard

YaffeShlomo02This Wednesday evening, April 22 at 6:45 pm, the Jewish Community will gather together for the  transition from Yom Hazikaron (Israel's Memorial Day) to Yom HaAtzmaut (Israel's Independence Day). 

The program is co-sponsored by The Adams Street Shul and other orthodox shuls in the Greater Boston area.  This year the program will take place at Congregation Beth El Atereth Israel.

This event gives us an opportunity to express appreciation to the Almighty for the modern-day miracle of the State of Israel, and express our support for all Israel has accomplished in the sixty-seven years since its creation.

This program will be preceded by Mincha at 6:30 pm.  Then our observance will remember Israel’s fallen soldiers.  Maariv at 7:40 pm will separate Yom HaZikaron from Yam HaAtzmaut, and will kick off a festive party.

Newton, Massachustts - orthodox synagogue - shul near BostonThe Adams Street Shul is an orthodox synagogue located near Boston, Massachusetts.  The congregation was founded in 1911 — and the shul building built in 1912 — by immigrants who had been settling there since the 1890's, mostly from Hungary and the Ukraine.

The synagogue is located in the Nonantum neighborhood of Newton, less than five miles from downtown Boston. Newton is famously safe, and extremely convenient to all the Boston attractions, colleges, high-tech employment, and world-class medical centers.

The Adams Street Synagogue is also convenient to mikvaot and day schools, enjoys having an eruv, and often partners with the other orthodox synagogues within walking distance.

In the last decade of the 20th century, the antique synagogue was physically restored, and its small, vibrant congregation has been growing ever since. 

The shul's members benefit from Newton's excellent municipal services. The shul's Nonantum neighborhood has more homes for rent, more two-family homes, and lower cost houses than can be found in Brookline, Sharon, or other parts of Newton. And there is an eruv.

Individuals and young families relocating to the Boston area for its job market or educational opportunities find the Adams Street Shul to be a place where they can become active and really make a difference in a welcoming, haimish community.

The synagogue building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and the congregation has been housed there continuously for over a century.

For more information, explore the synagogue's website or contact President Benyomin Fleischmann to arrange a tour or Shabbat hospitality.

Join our diverse congregation, over one hundred years old and still going strong!

Any Jewish person, eighteen years or older, is eligible for membership in the Congregation. Click for the membership application.

The Adams Street Synagogue is Newton's oldest synagogue.  Our historic building is a warm and intimate setting for our small, growing congregation. Take an on-line historical tour here.

The Adams Street Shul has built and maintans an Eruv in Nonantum, which is one of the most affordable Newton neighborhoods. See the map of the Nonantum Eruv for details.

We are an independent, historic Orthodox shul that serves a diverse congregation and the broader community.

We provide a place for davening, learning and spiritual growth, and a social environment where we celebrate life-cycle events.

We are building on the traditions of our founders and providing a link to the Jewish past.

We are a haimish, warm, caring, welcoming community, where everyone can contribute and be active in the life of the congregation.

We hope you will visit us when you visit Boston. If you live here, we hope you will participate in our educational classes, religious services, and holiday celebrations.

Welcome to the Website Administration area.

For your convenience, the most common tasks will be listed in the Shortcuts menu on the left.  (Still under development)

If you want to work only with items that you yourself have posted, the fastest and easiest way to find, edit, publish, and otherwise control your stuff is to click the Manage All My Stuff link.

If you have suggestions or bugs to report, email to get it taken care of.

We hope you will visit us when you visit Boston. Come participate in our educational classes, religious services, and holiday celebrations.

Shabbat hospitality is available. Email President Benyomin Fleischmann to let us know when you'd like to join us.

Check the status of our eruv on our Nonantum Eruv Pages.

There is also a Crowne Plaza hotel within walking distance of the shul.

Here are some excellent ways to celebrate a happy occasion,
memorialize a loved one, fulfill a pledge, or honor someone:


Weekly Events

  • Sponsor the Saturday morning kiddush ($72)
  • Sponsor the Sabbath Eruv ($54)
  • Sponsor the Saturday afternoon Third Meal ($36) 

 

Here are some excellent ways to celebrate a happy occasion, memorialize a loved one, fulfill a pledge, or honor someone:

Bookplates

  • A bookplate in one of our Chumashim, inscribed according to your instructions ($100)
  • A bookplate in one of our Siddurim or a library book, inscribed according to your instructions ($72)


Plaques

  • Memorial plaque on a bench along the East Wall ($725)
  • Memorial plaque on a seat in the sanctuary ($450)

Your support can help in so many different ways!

WeinbergRabbiNorbert.jpg
Rabbi Norbert Weinberg

Rabbi Weinberg gives a class on mitzvot (Jewish laws) or on  Parasha HaShavuah (the weekly Torah portion) on Wednesday evenings, in his home near the Shul. 

In addition, we are blessed with several congregants who are also terrific teachers:  

Rabbi Shlomo Yaffe teaches a gemara class at the Shul on Sunday mornings;  and gives a shiur on Midrash on Thursday evenings, around the corner from the Shul at Yury's Piano Shop.

YaffeShlomo03
Rabbi Shlomo Yaffe

We also have a children's program on Sabbath mornings, led by Chanie Yaffe and our teenagers. 

Throughout the year we have preparatory, holiday-related educational events, and occasional programs by visiting scholars. See our calendar for a list of everything that's going on, or contact our Education Committee Chairperson.

Many of our classes are recorded.  If you can't be here in person, enjoy our online audio and video recordings.  We also have a page of links to shiurim on this week's portion, updated daily from all over the Internet.


Personal Information:

Rabbi Weinberg was born in Bad Nauheim, Germany, to Dr. Seligmann and Kaethe (Cohn) Weinberg.  His father was a heart specialist in that city.  The rabbi has a brother and sister.

Photo (left): Norbert Weinberg begins school in Frankfort, Germany on April 25, 1938.  The bag he is carrying is filled with candies to encourage children in their new activities.

In 1938, his father was arrested by the Nazis and spent six weeks in the Buchenwald concentration camp.  After his release, the family was able to leave Germany and fly to England.  They spent about a year in London, after which they sailed to America.  

Photo (right): The immigration card permitting Norbert Weinberg to enter the United States, April 17, 1940. 

The rabbi and his wife, Susan, live in Newton.  He has four daughters and twenty-four grandchildren.  Three daughters live in Efrat, Israel, and one lives in Suffern, New York.

Educational Background:

Upon completion of elementary school in Yonkers, New York, the rabbi spent his first year of high school at the Samson Raphael Yeshiva in Washington Heights, New York.  He then enrolled in the Talmudical Academy, a branch of Yeshiva University, in New York City.   After graduating from the Academy, he continued at Yeshiva College, where he received his Bachelor of Arts degree.   He continued with his rabbinical studies for another three years, culminating in his semicha (ordination). 

Photo (right): Norbert Weinberg graduates Yeshiva College in June 1953.  He received his Rabbinical Ordination in 1957.

A number of years later, the rabbi received a Masters degree in Education from Rhode Island College.

Photo(left): Rabbi Weinberg with Senator Hubert Humphrey and Congresswoman Margaret Heckler in Washington when the Rabbi opened a session of Congress with an invocation, June 30, 1970.

Photo (below):Rabbi Weinberg at Plymouth Rock, with the late Chief Rabbi of the British Empire, Emmanuel Jacobowitz.

Professional Background:

While pursuing his rabbinical studies, Rabbi Weinberg was appointed the director of the Junior Congregation of Congregation Sons of Israel in Yonkers, New York.  He began to teach in its Hebrew school of some two hundred students and soon became its principal.  This position included formulation of curricula, hiring and supervision of staff, as well as establishing rapport with the parents of the student body.

Upon receiving semicha, Rabbi Weinberg assumed his first pulpit, in Quebec City, Canada, at Congregation Beth Israel.   Although a small Jewish community in number, it afforded him the opportunity of being engaged in every facet of rabbinic responsibilities, both within the Jewish community and as its representative to the general population. 

Photo (left): Rabbi Weinberg signing The Golden Book of Quebec City, Canada, September 12, 1957.

 

After two years, the rabbi moved to New Bedford, Massachusetts, where he assumed the pulpit of Congregation Ahavath Achim, where he served for eight years.  He again became responsible for the rabbinic needs of the congregation, as well as its Hebrew school and adult studies.  At this time, he also became the director of Camp Tikvah, a children’s summer day camp. 

Rabbi Weinberg then responded to a call from Congregation Adas Israel in Fall River, Massachusetts, where his scope of responsibilities were similar to his former pulpits, but with a number of additions:  He became the Jewish chaplain at the Walpole State Prison, and did chaplaincy work at a local Corrigan Health Center, as well as the Fall River Jewish Home for the Aged. 

Photo (right): Rabbi Weinberg presenting a Torah Scroll donated by Congregation Adas Yisrael to Israeli soldiers stationed in Kabrit, near the Suez Canal, on January 24, 1974.

Photo (left): Rabbi Weinberg meeting President Jimmy Carter at the White House.

The rabbi also served as sofer (scribe) for the Vaad HaRabbonim of Massachusetts (The Rabbinical Court).   Because of schedule constraints, he now is “on call” to perform these functions when needed. 

Photo (right): Lighting the menorah at Congregation Adas Israel in Fall River, Mass., December 1985.

When the rabbi’s long-range contract of thirty years expired, he chose to pursue a part-time (weekend) position at Congregation Brothers of Joseph in Norwich, Connecticut.  

In 2005, Rabbi Weinberg pursued a part-time position closer to home, becoming the Rabbi of the historic Adams Street Shul, in Newton, Massachusetts. 

Photo (left): Rabbi Weinberg
planting trees in Israel
with his grandchildren,
May 30, 2000.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publications:

Besides teaching and pursuing his rabbinic responsibilities, Rabbi Weinberg’s main avocation is in the field of writing.  To date, he has published the following four books:

  • The Essential Torah --- a review of the weeky Torah and Haftarah readings.
  • Beyond the Wall --- a compilation of fictional short stories, depicting how visits to the Western Wall in Jerusalem affected various individuals.
  • In the Footsteps --- a collection of Yahrzeit lectures delivered by Rabbi Weinberg in memory of his father.
  • A Time to Tell --- Recently published autobiographical memoirs of the rabbi.

GlassFamily 01Rabbi Mark Glass, a native of Manchester, England, received his BA in Philosophy, MA in Jewish Philosophy, and Semikhah from Yeshiva University’s various schools.  Prior to that, Rabbi Glass spent over two years learning in Yeshivat Hakotel in Jerusalem.  Rabbi Glass was the Rabbinic Intern for two years at Congregation Ahavas Achim in Highland Park, NJ, and has also worked for ORA (the Organization for the Resolution of Agunot) as Assistant Director of Advocacy.  Rabbi Glass lives with his wife, Ruthy, a post-doctoral fellow at Harvard University, and their son Yair.

 

Beyond the Wall
(1978)

fictional stories about how diverse people's lives were affected by their encounters with the Western Wall

Perhaps the greatest frustration of the pilgrim to the Western Wall is the difficulty of conveying the depth of feeling evoked by the encounter.  In this series of short stories, Rabbi Weinberg has succeeded in giving voice to the soul-stirring response of a number of fascinating characters who seek proximity to this ancient and sacred site.

The diverse heroes of the book represent a panorama of modern society – a young kibbutznik who doesn’t believe; the austere son of a famous mystic; Mottel, the humble Jerusalem tailor; a liberated woman executive from America … and more.   Each experience is brought to the reader with force and unpredictable surprise that renders the thread between objective reality and contrived fiction a thin one indeed.

Implicit between the lines and chapters of this delightful collection is the author’s conviction that the Wall – most sacred of Jewish shrines – is the silent and majestic witness to a venerable past, about to usher in a glorious and messianic future.

In the Footsteps
(1996)

a collection of yahrzeit lectures delivered by Rabbi Weinberg in memory of his father.

The author’s goal is to present to a fundamental understanding and appreciation of many topics of contemporary Judaism, including themes such as: Israel and its implications regarding the rebuilding of the Holy Temple, the Jewish concepts of conversion, confession, marriage, prophecy and dreams, the philosophical foundations of human relations and prayer, and searching for the common denominator that marks the Jewish faith as a “beacon of light” to humanity.

This book will be of value to everyone seeking basic insight into the practical laws that define these major concepts, as well as a broader appreciation of the ultimate message of the Torah and its Jewish way of life.

The lectures, originally distributed among family and friends in pamphlet form, contain numerous allusions to the author’s parents, Dr. Seligmann and Kaethe Weinberg, who managed to bring themselves and their children to America in the 1930’s, when the clouds of the Holocaust had begun to cast shadows over Europe.

The Essential Torah
(1997)

a review of the weeky Torah and Haftarah readings

Here is a volume that will serve as an indispensable aid for those who wish to acquaint themselves with the grandeur of the Bible and the teachings of the Prophets.   The author has presented in clear and concise language:

  • A faithful review of each weekly Torah reading.
  • A synopsis of each Prophetic reading.
  • A liberal selection from the classical commentaries.

Each chapter is a thorough review of the weekly Torah portion.   Great personalities emerge as human beings.  Their messages are no longer camouflaged by the “thee’s” and “thou’s” of complicated, antiquated English translations, and their thoughts and deeds serve as positive inspiration for each reader.  The Prophetic chapter that completes the Torah section of each Sabbath service is also reviewed.

The short notes from the classical commentaries demonstrate the profound meanings and implications within the biblical passages, and serve as a basis upon which readers may draw their own personal conclusions and meaningful interpretations.

The Essential Torah certainly makes no claim to being the last word in Bible study.   However, it does offer a refreshing and complete review of the Torah and should be enthusiastically received by those who desire to avail themselves of this treasury of knowledge.

A Time to Tell
(2004)

autobiographical memoirs of the rabbi

As a rabbi and lecturer, Norbert Weinberg has reached many audiences with his spirited and vibrant talks.  As an author, he has taken his countless readers to exciting and inspirational parts of the world.  Now he combines both of these talents in his latest book, A TIME TO TELL, a fascinating and adventuresome chronicles of the highlights of his life.

We read of a young boy going to school in Germany just as the Holocaust begins to unfold.   With his family, he finds himself in pre-WWII London en route to America.   Dressed in knickers and European garb, he braves the American schools with a poor command of the language.   He is urged to participate in leading a Passover Seder, but can’t get past the word “distinguished.”

Determined to overcome all obstacles, he achieves ordination as a rabbi, and a number of academic degrees.  In his new career, he meets personages such as Senator Edward Kennedy, President Jimmy Carter, Senator Hubert Humphrey and others.  At one point, he is invited to open the House of Representatives with an invocation.

In a humorous vein, he recounts how a brooding Christian portrait of over his bed in a Quebec City boarding house stares down at him as he is trying to fall asleep.

As his family grows by leaps and bounds, he takes numerous trips to Israel, where a number of his children have made their home.  His observations of the hopes and dreams of peace in the Middle East are truly inspirational.

Delightful experiences and current issues make this book a page-turner.   The poignant warmth of this book should ignite the heart of every reader.

To purchase these books, or for more information,
e-mail the Rabbi at

 


Rabbi Norbert Weinberg

(617) 467-4647

Rabbi Weinberg is available to assist all our members as a counselor, teacher, and decisor; to help all members take their religious identities and spiritual destinies into their own hands, and grow in Jewish living.

Send E-mail to Rabbi Weinberg
Rabbi Weinberg's On-line Classes
Rabbi Weinberg's Biography
Rabbi Weinberg's Books
From the Rabbi's Study
GlassRabbiMark 450x600

Rabbi Mark Glass

(617) xxx-yyyy

Rabbi Glass is available to assist all our members as a counselor, teacher, and decisor; to help all members take their religious identities and spiritual destinies into their own hands, and grow in Jewish living.

Send E-mail to Rabbi Glass
Rabbi Glass's Biography

Here are some excellent ways to celebrate a happy occasion, memorialize a loved one, fulfill a pledge, or honor someone:

  • A bookplate one of our Chumashim,
    inscribed according to your instructions ($54)
  • A bookplate one of our Siddurim or a library book,
    inscribed according to your instructions ($36)
  • A bookplate in one of our Passover haggadot,
    inscribed according to your instructions ($18)
  • Memorial plaque on a bench along the East Wall ($725)
  • Memorial plaque on a seat in the sanctuary ($450)


Or make a donation to one of our special purpose funds:

  • The Restoration Fund --- restores and maintains the historic building
  • The Eruv Fund --- maintains The Nonantum Eruv
  • The Israel Bonds Fund --- purchases Israel Bonds for the shul
  • The Torah Fund --- maintains our scrolls
  • The Library Fund --- is used to purchase books
  • The Tzedakah Fund --- supports the needy
  • The Grand Family Kiddush Fund --- sponsors kiddushes when individuals have not.


Or donate to one of our Endowment Funds, which are invested in the CJP Jewish Community Endowment Pool, and which generate income for special purposes:

  • The Rabbinic Fund
    --- subsidizes the compensation and housing of a Rabbi for the congregation.
  • The Gilfix-Galpern Family Flower Fund
    --- purchases flowers for the bima on the High Holy Days
  • The Preservation Fund
    --- in the event of the congregation's dissolution, this fund ensures the future of the historic building in perpetuity.

 

You can make a donation right now, using a credit card, electronic check, or the balance in your PayPal account.

 

 

To discuss opportunities to name any of our unnamed funds,
please contact Ronny Drapkin at .



July 2006  

The Grand Family Kiddush Fund

The Board of Directors of the Adams Street Shul has established a new endowment fund, called the "Grand Family Kiddush Fund" in honor of Bert Grand for his many years of dedicated service to the Adams Street Synagogue. The Fund's principle will be invested (along with our other endowed funds) in the CJP's Jewish Community Endowment Pool. Income from the Fund will enable the Board to sponsor kiddushes from time to time when no individuals have done so.

The Fund has been launched with a donation from Russell Grand, son of the Shul's Chairman of the Board Bert Grand, together with the rest of the Grand Family. The Board and the Grand Family encourage all of us to make donations to the Fund in honor of Bert, and so that Shabbos kiddushes will someday always be sponsored, either by individuals or the Fund. (Each $720 can generate enough annual income to provide one kiddush every year.)

Bert served as President of the Shul for many years, shepherding our transition from an historic building open only several times a year, to a thriving, active Jewish community. And his many other volunteer activities extend beyond his tenure as President.

This is a wonderful gift. Mazal Tov to Bert on this well-deserved honor!

August 2006

The Rabbinic Endowment Fund

The Board of Directors of the Adams Street Shul has established a new endowment fund, tentatively called "The Rabbinic Endowment Fund." The Fund's principle will be invested in CJP's Jewish Community Endowment Pool. Annual income from the Fund may be used to help fulfill the shul’s contractual obligations to its rabbi.

The Fund has been launched with a bequest from the Estate of Sadie Greenwald, an anonymous donation from a local charitable trust, and numerous donations in honor of Beri Gilfix. All of us are encouraged to make donations to this new Rabbinic Endowment Fund, so that someday our financial ability to have a rabbi may be secure in perpetuity.

The Rabbinic Endowment Fund brings the number of our endowed funds to three; it joins the the Gilfix-Galpern Family Flower Fund, and the Preservation Endowment Fund. For more information about our newest endowment fund, including information about opportunities to name the fund, contact Ronny Drapkin ( ) .


Subcategories

This is the category to use for regular news items about upcoming or recent events.  These articles will appear in the central column of the News page.

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After expiration, these articles will be automatically moved to the Expired News category and archived there. 

This category is for short items that will be published for a very long time, or that will be reused over and over forever.  Examples might include: a constant reminder about Israel Bonds, a standing notice about a recurring weekly event, a reminder to bring in Butcherie receipts, a longstanding solicitation for volunteers, etc. 

These items appear in a sidebar on the News page. 

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This is the category to use for temporary items soliciting volunteers to perform specific tasks, or thanking volunteers for jobs well done.  Make a hero every week!

These articles will appear in a sidebar on the News page.

  • To create a new item, click the NEW button at the bottom of the item list. 
    (Never overwrite the contents of an old item to make a new one.) 
  • Assign a Finish Publishing date to your item.  (Optionally, assign a start date.)
  • Click the Content Editor's readmore button imagebutton to divide lengthy items into an introduction and a body.
  • Click the "Featured" checkbox if you want the article to be included in the Newsletter and have its headline appear as a link in the Featured Headlines module on the Home page and elsewhere. 

After expiration, these articles will be automatically moved to the Expired News category and archived there. 

This is the category for the President's blog entries.  Items in this category appear in the newsletter if newer than the previous issue. They also appear in a feature on the News page for a while.  The President's Blog menu item presents the complete blog, but that menu item has been moved from under News to under Archives, since the current president does not blog.

The idea of the President's blog isn't to replicate news that can be found elsewhere on the site, but rather to provide a personal commentary in a first-person, conversational manner, that will advance the Shul's communications and image marketing goals.

  • If you are posting on behalf of the President, be sure to fill in the "Author Alias" field, so the article's by-line won't name you.
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  • To create a new item, click the NEW button at the bottom of the item list.

A Welcome Page Insertion should consist of a button, or a link, or a very short message.  Welcome Page Insertions will appear atop the rightmost column of the Welcome Page.

(Typical uses for a Welcome Page Insertion would be to insert a button that links to a particular article, or that takes a donation, or that makes an event reservation.) 

The weekly Ritual information that normally appears in that column (Shabbat times, Torah Portion, and Minyan Schedule) will be pushed down to make room for any Welcome Page Insertions. 

Since the other columns on the page won't lengthen, the layout of the Welcome Page will become awkward if Welcome Page Insertions are long or many. 

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Most of the time, there will be nothing published in this category.

Emergency notices that require immediate attention (such as funerals and event cancellations) should be published in the Newsflash category, not here!

Tuesday, January 16, 2018
29 Tevet 5778

Nachas Notes

Happy Anniversary to Michael Hafkin and Luba Kantorovich! (Dec. 29)
Happy birthday to Jane Rosen! (December 31st)
Happy birthday to Mattan Yedidya Lakein, on January 8th.
Happy Birthday, Bert Grand!
Happy birthday to Yishai Ashkenazi!
Happy Birthday to Mark Stepner (January 16th)!
Happy Anniversary to Yishai and Livia Ashkenazi! (Jan. 19)
Happy Birthday to Sarah Freyda Steingart-Rubnich! (Jan. 27th and 12 Shevat)
Happy Birthday to Levi Yitzchak, son of Rabbi and Mrs. Yale and Rivkie Spalter, grandson of Rabbi and Mrs. Shlomo and Chanie Yaffe! (February 5th and Tu B'Shevat)
Happy Birthday to Shalva Tagayl Sloane, on February 5th.
Happy birthdays to Dina Rebecca (Dina Rivkah) Wagner and Silvia Malkah (Malkah Sima) Wagner, on February 5th and Shevat 29.

Refuah List

Devorah bas Leah

Donate to the Shul Without it Costing You a Cent

When you shop at The Butcherie in Brookline, remember to ask for your receipt to be stamped. When you bring your stamped receipts to the shul, we turn them in, and The Butcherie donates to the Shul.

Bring your Butcherie receipts to the Shul and drop them in the pouch on the office door.  The Butcherie will donate 3% of your credit card purchases, and 5% of your cash or check purchases, to the Shul. It adds up!

Hey, People of the Book!

Many of us buy stuff over the Internet; everything from books and DVDs to pet food and tomato sauce. And many of us use Amazon.com, the world's largest store. Instead of going to Amazon.com by typing that into your computer, please go there by using one the links below, and Amazon will donate about 6% of your purchase to the shul.  Since they usually have the best prices, you save too!

For example: Here's a link to buy the Artscroll Siddur: Nusach Sefard (the same Siddur we use in the Shul).  And here's the The Chumash: The Stone Edition (the same one we use in the Shul). Or any Books at all!

In fact, Amazon donates to the Shul when you buy anything (if you go to Amazon via our links), including: 

So please use these links to help the Shul whenever you shop. Thanks!

Shop Amazon and Support the Shul

We are very pleased that the Adams Street Shul is a non-profit associate of Amazon.com.  This means that any purchase you make from Amazon, initiated from the the Shul's website or email link, results in a percentage of that purchase being donated to our organization.  Bookstoolstoyselectronics,  anything!

Whenever you are planning to buy something from Amazon.com, please start that transaction from this link, or from our website.  


Here is our direct link to Amazon. This process is easy for your convenience, and, at the same time, allows you to support the important works of the Adams Street Shul.

 

We hope you will take advantage of this great opportunity to raise funds for the Shul!  Thank you so much for your support.

Shabbat Times

Candle-Lighting in Nonantum for Friday, January 19, is at 4:26 pm.    Shabbat concludes at 5:27 pm on Saturday, January 20.  

Torah Portion

This Saturday is Shabbat Bo.  
(The Torah Reading is Shemot 10:1-13:16;   and the Haftarah is Jeremiah 46:13-28.)

Upcoming Educational Events

Thank Our Eruv Sponsors

No events

Thank Our Kiddush Sponsors

Sat, December 2
available


Sat, December 9
available


Sat, December 16
available


Sat, December 23
available


Sat, December 30
available


Sat, January 6
available


Sat, January 13
available


Thank Our Mincha Layners

No events

Chesed Committee Contacts

  • Shiva meals: Elena Medvedovsky ()
  • Births: Anna Steingart ()
  • Serious Illness: Nechama Fleischmann ()

If You Feed Them, They Will Come

Bert Grand at the Shul Centennial Red Sox OutingWe hope you have enjoyed the pleasant socializing each week after Shabbat morning services. Have you ever wondered how the shul manages to provide the kiddush even on weeks when it has not been sponsored? 

The Grand Family Kiddush Fund sponsors the kiddush whenever no one else has.  Even if you cannot sponsor a kiddush on your own, small donations in any amount are always welcome.  Simply designate that your donation is for The Grand Family Kiddush Fund. 

It's a nice way to honor someone, celebrate a simcha, or memorialize a loved one.  You can donate online now.